Online Essays and Exhibitions

on

William Hogarth

The Site for Research on William Hogarth

Source Literature, Part III



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ONLINE BIOGRAPHIES OF WILLIAM HOGARTH:




Dale Keiger, "A Scholar's Progress", Johns Hopkins Magazine, November 2000.
Article paying tribute to Ronald Paulson's pioneering work on Hogarth. At the same time an easily readable introduction to Hogarth's life and art.


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Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Hogarth, William.

Comprehensive biography written by David Bindman. Contents: Early career: the 1720s -- Beginnings as a painter -- The first 'modern moral subjects': A Harlot's Progress and A Rake's Progress -- After the Rake: new challenges -- Portrait painting: an English grand manner -- 'Comic history painting' and Marriage a-la-mode -- Contrasting directions: history painting and the lower Class of People -- The state of the nation: The March to Finchley and the Election series -- Reflecting on art: The Analysis of Beauty -- Hogarth under attack: Sandby and Reynolds -- The artist embattled: the Sigismunda affair -- The wrong politics: Hogarth on the defensive -- A feeling mind: retaliation, despair, and death -- Posthumous reputation and afterlife -- Sources.


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"Hogarth, William (1697-1764)" by Austin Dobson.

Austin Dobson's contribution to volume 27 of the Dictionary of National Biography (1885-1900). Dobson was the leading Hogarth biographer of his time.


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A Biography of William Hogarth by Austin Dobson.

Online version of Austin Dobson's article on Hogarth in the 1911 edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica, with additional hyperlinks.


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William Hogarth.

Susan Elizabeth Benenson's article on Hogarth for the 1985 edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica.


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Philadelphia Museum of Art: William Hogarth.

Biographical essay written by Richard Dorment, from British Painting in the Philadelphia Museum of Art: From the Seventeenth through the Nineteenth Century (1986), 153-56.


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John Nichols, "Biographical essay on the genius and works of Hogarth (Part I)", ed. Clifford Armion, La Clé des Langues (Lyon).

First part of the online version of a biographical essay first published in The Works of William Hogarth, from the Original Plates restored by James Heath (London, 1822). Part of an excellent Hogarth project by Clifford Armion, Professor of English at the Université de Lyon.


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John Nichols, "Biographical essay on the genius and works of Hogarth (Part II)", ed. Clifford Armion, La Clé des Langues (Lyon).

Second part of the online version of a biographical essay first published in The Works of William Hogarth, from the Original Plates restored by James Heath (London, 1822). Part of an excellent Hogarth project by Clifford Armion, Professor of English at the Université de Lyon.


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Mary Webster, "Hogarth 'pittore dell'umanità' ".

Extensive biographical essay, written in Italian. Excerpt from the Italian exhibition catalogue, William Hogarth: Dipinti, Disegni, Incisioni (1989).


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William Hogarth (1697-1764).

Biography with special attention to the historical background, however containing some questionable assessments, for instance, as far as Hogarth's borrowings from other masters are concerned.


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Old And Sold: Life of Hogarth.

Biography originally published as part of George Elliot Anstruther's William Hogarth (London: George Bell & Sons. 1902). See also this online version of Anstruther's book.


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William Hogarth.

Biography of some length. Part of a Humanities Web site on William Hogarth.


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Shaun Wourm: William Hogarth's Realm: Biography.

Comprehensive chronology from the birth of the artist's father, Richard Hogarth, in 1663 or 1664, to the death of William Hogarth in 1764.


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Powell & Wood: Hogarth, William.

Detailed chronology, chiefly borrowed from Shaun Wourm. Formerly part of a commercial project management consultants' Web site.


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Anaïs Le Fèvre-Berthelot, "William Hogarth" (2007), La Clé des Langues (Lyon).

French biography dealing with the artistic and cultural contexts and Hogarth's francophobia.


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William Hogarth (1697-1764).

Biography primarily borrowed from the first volume of John Nichols / George Steevens, The Genuine Works of William Hogarth, published in 1808.


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Wikipedia.org: William Hogarth.

Essay on Hogarth from Wikipedia, the free Internet encyclopedia, gathering paragraphs written by many different contributors.


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ART "4" "2"-DAY: Born on 10 November 1697: William Hogarth.

Survey of Hogarth's life and work, including several hyperlinks.


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William Hogarth: Peintre et graveur anglais.

French discussion of Hogarth's careers as an engraver, painter, satirist, and author of The Analysis of Beauty.


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Shorter Biographies:









ONLINE ESSAYS ON WILLIAM HOGARTH:




Robert L. S. Cowley, "An Examination and Interpretation of Narrative Features in 'A Rake's Progress' ", M.A. thesis, University of Birmingham, 1972.
Online presentation of the typewritten manuscript of an outstanding M.A. thesis by Hogarthian scholar Robert L. S. Cowley.


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Robert L. S. Cowley, "A Review of William Hogarth's 'Marriage à la Mode' with Particular Reference to Character and Setting", Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham, 1977.

Online version of Cowley's excellent Ph.D. thesis, which was later published as as Marriage A-la-Mode: a re-view of Hogarth's narrative art, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1983.


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Mark McNally, "The marketing techniques of William Hogarth (1697-1764), artist and engraver", MLitt thesis, Durham University, 2014.

Pdf version of the author's thesis. See also this abstract.


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Shaun Wourm, "Ambiguities and Paradoxes in Hogarth's Industry and Idleness".

Online version of the author's M.A. dissertation, Université Lumière Lyon II, 1997. Offers an in-depth interpretation of the twelve prints of Hogarth's Industry and Idleness series. The study is divided into two parts: I: An iconological Reading of Industry and Idleness; II: Inversion and Paradoxes: the hidden discourse of Industry and Idleness.


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Ekaterina Rozanova, "Hogarth, Goya, Greuze: Moral Social Issues in Art of the Eighteenth Century", Diplomarbeit (M.A. thesis), University of Vienna, 2009.

M.A. thesis discussing how Hogarth, Goya and Greuze provided an observation of moral social issues through their art. While people in previous centuries based their observation about life and human nature on religious beliefs, the eighteenth century began to explain life and human nature more critically in terms of science and reason. The study deals with prostitution, alcoholism, physical and sexual atrocities, ignorance of the wealthy and powerful, and issues related to marriage and family life.


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The Harlot's Progress in Context.

Excellent website created by Anne Wilne and a class of third-year undergraduate students at the University of Toronto Scarborough during the winter semester of 2015. Gives an in-depth analysis of Hogarth's A Harlot's Progress. Each of the six plates has been annotated, providing context to scholarly sources. The engravings can be enlarged for highly detailed viewing. Additionally, each theme can be explored individually through the sidebar.


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Bernd Krysmanski, "A Harlot's Progress von William Hogarth: Aufstieg und Fall einer Hure. Ein kurzer Überblick für deutsche Leser".

Explanation of the six prints of A Harlot's Progress for German readers. Includes many illustrations not to be found elsewhere and extensive bibliographical references.


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Werner Busch, "Die englische Kunst des 18. Jahrhunderts: Teil 1: William Hogarth".

Detailed analyses of the first scenes of A Rake's Progress and Marriage A-la-Mode. Part of a German online course offered by the faculty of the History of Art Department at the Freie Universität Berlin.


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Arthur S. Marks, "Hogarth's Mackinen Children", British Art Journal, Volume 9, 2008.

Comprehensive analysis of the supposed origin of, and the complex narrative and allegory within, Hogarth's portrait of the Mackinen Children.


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Diana Francocci, "The Graham Children and Painting Related to Childhood" (1997).

Interesting online article on the children depicted in Hogarth's works.


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Philip Momberger, "Cinematic Techniques in William Hogarth's A Harlot's Progress", Journal of Popular Culture, Vol. 33, Issue 2 (Fall 1999).

Examines the six engravings of A Harlot's Progress as if they composed a motion picture's preparatory "story board" or as if they were frames in a black-and-white silent film.


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Aaron Santesso, "William Hogarth and the Tradition of Sexual Scissors", Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, 39 (Summer 1999).

Deals with the pair of scissors hanging from Moll Hackabout's belt in A Harlot's Progress, plate 1, and the sexual symbolism of scissors in some other works by Hogarth and in literary contexts.


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Robert Baldwin, Actaeon and the Allegory of Vision in Hogarth's Marriage à la Mode IV: La Toilette.

Paper dealing with the motif of an African boy pointing to the horns of a statue of Actaeon as a punning reference to cuckoldry - a suggestive detail that raises a host of larger issues crucial for Marriage A-la-Mode and for Hogarth's art in general, including adultery, racial stereotypes and miscegenation, art collecting and courtly aesthetics.


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Tonya Howe, "Irregular Theater, the Discourse of Farce, and Hogarth's Line of Deformity", Cerisia Cerosa, 24 March 2007.

On "irregular", and problematic, eighteenth-century popular theatrical performances ("dumb shews") that curiously form the foundational metaphor of Hogarth's own Analysis of Beauty.


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James Breig, "Ingenious and Inimitable, Artist William Hogarth Chided Authority, Ridiculed Pomposity, Mocked Religion, Pointed Out Misbehavior, and Invented the Satirical Comic Strip", Colonial Williamsburg Journal, 36, no. 1 (Winter 2014).

Sees Hogarth as an inventor of "comic strips with serious points to make, and acerbic political cartoons", who "had the ability to simultaneously amuse, shock, and change society" and whose influence can be detected in cartoonists of the nineteenth and twenteenth centuries.


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Bernd Krysmanski, "We see a ghost: Hogarth's satire on Methodists and Connoisseurs".

Text of an article first published in the Art Bulletin, 80 (June 1998). It compares Hogarth's anti-Methodist print Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism (1762) with its rather different, unpublished first state, Enthusiasm Delineated (1761). The latter is revealed as a polemic on shopworn French academic art theory and on misplaced, even erotically passionate enthusiasm for the old masters.


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Bernd Krysmanski, "Upsetting the Balance: Hogarth and Roger de Piles".

Excerpt from the author's study of Hogarth's Enthusiasm Delineated. An extended German version of this online essay, dealing with the contemporary literary background at some length, can be found in Joachim Möller's Sister Arts volume.


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Bernd Krysmanski, "Lust in Hogarth's Sleeping Congregation - Or, How to Waste Time in Post-Puritan England".

This essay suggests that the overriding theme of the engraved version of The Sleeping Congregation is Hogarth's post-Puritan view of the old vice of Acedia (indolence or sloth). It is shown that the print ironically updates a long pictorial and literary tradition of sleeping during a sermon; sleep, the characteristic signifier of indolence however combined with lustful thoughts within Hogarth's print.


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Bernd Krysmanski, "'O the Roast Beef of Old England': Hogarth in BSEfreier Zeit vor dem Tor von Calais", Lichtenberg-Jahrbuch 1997, 29-52.

Explains the nationalist implications of the English taste for roast beef and the Francophobe and antipapist sideswipes and puns in Hogarth's The Gate of Calais. The paper compares, in addition, the gate as shown in the picture with a traditional Gate of Hell and the contrasting motifs of a fat monk and meager French soldiers with Bosch's Gula and Bruegel's Poor and Rich Kitchen.


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Clifford Armion (ed.), The Works of William Hogarth, La Clé des Langues (Lyon).

Online version of The Works of William Hogarth, from the Original Plates restored by James Heath (London, 1822). Part of this excellent Hogarth project by Clifford Armion, Professor of English at the Université de Lyon, are also some additional online essays in French by Armion, Anaïs Le Fèvre-Berthelot, Isabelle Baudino and Nicole Henry. "The primary aim of this project is to facilitate access to William Hogarth's works on the web and to create a coherent database for teachers and researchers."


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Georg Christoph Lichtenberg: Ausführliche Erklärung der Hogarthischen Kupferstiche.

Online version of Georg Christoph Lichtenberg's famous German commentaries on Hogarth's engravings (1794-99).


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Wikipedia: The Four Stages of Cruelty.

Featured Wikipedia article on Hogarth's prints of The Four Stages of Cruelty.


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Maureen Warren, "William Hogarth's Four Stages of Cruelty and Moral Blindness".

Claims that the Cruelty series was influenced by John Locke's notion of sensibility and Lord Shaftesbury's writings about the moral sense.


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Wikipedia: Four Times of the Day.

Featured Wikipedia article on Hogarth's four paintings and prints of the Four Times of the Day series.


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Wikipedia: A Rake's Progress.

Featured German Wikipedia article on Hogarth's A Rake's Progress. Better than the English and French versions.


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Wikipedia: The Distrest Poet.

Good Wikipedia article on Hogarth's painting and print of The Distrest Poet.


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Benjamin N. Ungar, "Take Me to the Southwark Fair: William Hogarth's Snapshot of the Life and Times of England's Migrating Early 18th Century Poor".

Discusses Hogarth's Southwark Fair as a pictorial account of the social and cultural state of the lower urban class in early eighteenth century England.


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Valentines Mansion: Southwark Fair.

Includes some remarks on the provenance of Hogarth's painting of Southwark Fair. States that Sir Charles Raymond gave 200 guineas for the painting. As Raymond was the owner of Valentines, it seems that the picture may have hung in Valentines from the 1760s until it was sold in 1797 after the death of Donald Cameron.


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Finley Foster, "William Hogarth and the Doctors", Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, 32, no. 3 (July 1944).

Discusses Hogarth's depiction of quack doctors in plate 5 of A Harlot's Progress; The Company of Undertakers; plate 3 of Marriage A-la-Mode; and The Reward of Cruelty.


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New Light on Hogarth.

Jeremy Bell's site on William Hogarth. Bell has always been fascinated with the work of the first truly British artist. He especially enjoys finding the many clues Hogarth left that tell the story in each painting and reading through the many commentaries that bring them to light.


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Making History Tart and Titillating: Life Takes Lemons: 18th Century Reading Room: Hogarth's The Harlot's Progress, Plate 1.

First part of a detailed analysis of the six prints of Hogarth's A Harlot's Progress. Commentary by Susan Ardelie, an eighteenth-century enthusiast. See also the commentaries on Plate 2, Plate 3, Plate 4, Plate 5 and Plate 6.


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William Hogarth Essay - Critical Essays.

e-notes article including brief biographical information, a short account of Hogarth's major works and some notes about the critical reception of his art.


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Jayme Yahr, Appropriating Identity: William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough, and Britain's Myth of the Self-Made Man.

On Hogarth and Gainsborough who exemplify the myth of the self-made man and comment on the shifting British social classes.


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Isabel Greschat, "William Hogarth - Ein Moralerzieher zwischen Hoffnung und Ratlosigkeit", Pädagogische Korrespondenz, 9 (1991), 67-83.

German analysis of oppositional structures characterizing Hogarth's Industry and Idleness series.


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Göttinger Taschen Calender 1787: Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, Leichtgläubigkeit, Aberglauben und Fanatismus. Eine gemischte Gesellschaft. Mit der Unterschrift aus I. Joh. IV. cap., v. 13 von W. Hogarth.

Online version of Georg Christoph Lichtenberg's German eighteenth-century commentary on Hogarth's Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism. PDF document scholarly annotated by the late Professor Wolfgang Promies.


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Antony Clayton, "Credulity, Superstition and Fanaticism: who believed in ghosts in Hogarth's England?".

Online essay which attempts to unravel the intriguing iconography of Hogarth's print Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism. The author identifies the characters and events in order to illuminate the beliefs and attitudes toward ghosts and the supernatural in the middle of the eighteenth century.


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SECULARIZATION & MODERNITY RESOURCES: Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism.

Short commentary by Thomas Pfau on Hogarth's anti-Methodist print. There are also some remarks by the same author on The Sleeping Congregation.


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William Hogarth's Cunicularii. Wellcome Library Item of the month, April 2010.

Detailed discussion of Hogarth's etching, Cunicularii, or The Wise Men of Godliman in Consultation (1726), which satirises the story of Mary Toft who claimed that she could give birth to rabbits.


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David Dabydeen, "Black People in Britain: Hogarth - The Savage and the Civilised", History Today, Volume 31, Issue 9 (1981).

Article looking at Hogarth's representations of black people in the eighteenth century. See also BBC History: David Dabydeen, "The Black Figure in 18th-century Art".


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Robin Simon, "Hogarth's London".

Lecture held at Gresham College, 8 October 2007. Part of the "Visual Impressions of London" lecture series.


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Robin Simon, "High politics and Hellfire: William Hogarth's Portrait of Francis Dashwood".

Lecture held at Gresham College, 3 November 2008.


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Andrew Graham Dixon, BBC TV documentary "Hogarth's Progress".

A few extracts from Andrew Graham-Dixon's BBC TV documentary "Hogarth's Progress" featuring the author and David Bindman discussing Hogarth's "modern moral subjects".


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Henry Grubb, "A Look at 18th Century London through the prints of William Hogarth, Gin Lane and Beer Street".

Paper produced for the NEH Seminar, "The Dutch Republic and Britain: The Making of Modern Society and a European World Economy" (2007).


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Richard Cavendish, "William Hogarth dies in London", History Today, Volume 64, 10 October 2014.

Brief life, written on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of Hogarth's death.


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Artble: A Rake's Progress.

Web page briefly dealing with the story of A Rake's Progress, inspiriations for the work, the critical reception of the series, and related paintings, etc.


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The Literary Encyclopedia: I. R. F. Gordon, "A Rake's Progress (1735)".

On the origin and content of the eight plates of Hogarth's Rake's Progress series in which Tom Rakewell "represents urban bourgeois innocence, brought to ruin by aristocratic pretension".


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The Rake's Progress by William Hogarth

Tony Grant's observations about Hogarth's A Rake's Progress, posted by Vic. Includes, apart from images of the eight Rake paintings, also some modern photographs of specific sites in London. Part of Jane Austen's World, a blog that brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive, but also contains details about Georgian London.


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Sophie Harland, "Hogarth's A Rake's Progress".

Brief account of Tom Rakewell's life as told by Hogarth in his Rake series. See also this Smarthistory version of the same article.


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Artble: Captain Coram.

On the sitter; inspirations for, and critical receptions of, the work; related portraits, etc.


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Wikipedia: Sigismunda mourning over the Heart of Guiscardo.

Good Wikipedia article on Hogarth's painting of Sigismunda Mourning over the Heart of Guiscardo.


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Artble: Sigismunda Mourning over the Heart of Guiscardo.

On the theme of the painting; inspirations for the work; its critical reception, etc.


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The Cultural and Technical Importance of Hogarth in the History of Artistic Forms.

Interesting remarks by Shaun Wourm on Thornhill's "Grand Manner", Hogarth's moral series and his breaking the codes, particularly his graphic puzzles in the tradition of allegories and emblems, his parodic subversion of the "Grand Manner", and the influence of the stage on him.


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Jenny Uglow, "Smithfield Muses".

Excerpt (pp. 3-21) from the first chapter of the author's Hogarth: A Life and a World (1997).


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Alain Lauzanne, "Réflexions sur l'espace et Londres dans l'oeuvre de William Hogarth", Arob@se: Journal des lettres & sciences humaines, 2, no. 2 (Winter 1996).

French article on Hogarth's London as seen in his works, focusing on pictorial space as a signifier of modified social conditions.


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FONTES 52: The Analysis of Beauty.

Digital version of Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty (1753), edited with an introduction by Charles Davis.


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E-Texts: William Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty.

Another online version of Hogarth's treatise of 1753.


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Digital Library for the Decorative Arts and Material Culture: Hogarth, William, 1697-1764 / The analysis of beauty: written with a view of fixing the fluctuating ideas of taste (1753).

Online version of the original pages of the first edition of Hogarth's treatise.


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UBC Fine Arts Library Displays: Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

Some notes on Hogarth's book including short explanations of some of its ideas and a bibliography.


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Peter Bexte, "Die Schönheit der Analyse".

Postscript to the modern German edition of Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty (Dresden: Verlag der Kunst, 1995).


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Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, "Hogarth, Zergliederung der Schönheit", "Hogarth, Zergliederung der Schönheit (II)", "Hogarth, Zergliederung der Schönheit (III)".

Online versions of Lessing's reviews of the contemporary German translation of Hogarth's treatise.


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Frédéric Ogée: Présentation de l'Analyse de la beauté (3 May 1999).

Abstract of a paper delivered at the French meeting on "L'échange et la beauté: Hogarth et quelques théoriciens du beau dans l'Angleterre du XVIIIe siècle". Explains central terms of Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty. Also puts Hogarth's treatise within the context of other aesthetic theories of the time (Shaftesbury, Addison, Jonathan Richardson).


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Werner Oechslin, Buch des Monats November 2000: William Hogarth: The Analysis of Beauty.

German thoughts on a passage in Lomazzo's treatise on art (1584-85) which, in its inexact English translation by Richard Haydocke (1598), had some influence upon Hogarth and the contemporary Italian and German translations of The Analysis of Beauty.


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William Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty. With a review by Armando Massarenti.

English translation of Armando Massarenti's review of C. Maria Laudando's Italian edition of The Analysis of Beauty. There is also an Italian version of the same web page. Part of a blog started by Giovanni Mazzaferro on art-historical sources.


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Jonathan Lamb, "Diagrams of Emotion: Hogarth's Blush and Maori Tattoos", The 18th-Century Common, 25 February 2013.

Using the pictorial tools of analysis offered by Hogarth, the author discusses the relation of blushing to tattooing by comparing Sidney Parkinson's drawings of tattooed Maori heads (1773) with Hogarth's diagram of a blush from Plate 2 to his Analysis of Beauty and with Titian's Diana and Actaeon.


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Ronald Paulson, "The Aesthetics of Mourning".

Scholarly essay published in Ralph Cohen's Studies in Eighteenth-Century British Art and Aesthetics (1985). Partly deals with the aesthetic theory behind the statuary yard depicted in The Analysis of Beauty, Plate 1.


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EARLY C18th AESTHETICS

Some notes on Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty. Shows that the serpentine line applies rather easily to many of the waves depicted by Peter Monamy, painter of marine subjects.


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Charles Lamb, On the Genius and Character of Hogarth (1811).

Online version of Charles Lamb's famous essay, "On the Genius and Character of Hogarth; With Some Remarks on a Passage in the Writings of the Late Mr. Barry." Includes some illustrations.


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Bill Ruddick, "Artist or Novelist? Lamb, Hazlitt and the Nineteenth-Century Response to Hogarth", The Charles Lamb Bulletin, n.s. 61 (January 1988), 145-155.

On Charles Lamb's essay "On the Genius and Character of Hogarth", William Hazlitt's lecture on "The English Comic Writers" and William Makepeace Thackeray's "The English Humourists of the Eighteenth Century".


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Kate Lonas, "William Hogarth's Old Masters: Absent Adversaries".

Online essay primarily dealing with Hogarth's self-portrait of 1745; the satirical details in Taste in High Life; and the Old Master pictures within the pictures of the Marriage A-la-Mode series.


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Caricature: Hogarth

Excerpt from The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907-21), Volume XIV: The Victorian Age.


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Great Works: Characters and Caricaturas (1743): William Hogarth.

Independent article interpreting Hogarth's print as a kind of "Identity Parade".


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WILLIAM HOGARTH: The Man, The Artist and His Masonic Circle.

Paper by W.Bro. Yasha Beresiner dealing with Hogarth's involvement with freemasonry, both artistically and personally.


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Jacob Hugo Tatsch, "William Hogarth", MasonicDictionary.com.

The first part of this paper provides a short account of Hogarth's life and art, the second part is on the artist as a freemason. Source: The Builder, March 1923.


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Laurence Sterne and William Hogarth in Parallel.

Web site on Laurence Sterne and Hogarth created by S. Piazza, I. Grassi and I. Mastroianni.


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Henry Fielding's Debt to William Hogarth.

Excerpt from V[ivian] de S[ola] Pinto, 'William Hogarth', in The New Pelican Guide to English Literature: 4. From Dryden to Johnson (1997). On Hogarth and Fielding, see also the Preface to Joseph Andrews (1742).


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History of the 19th Century in Political Cartoons. By Arthur Bartlett Maurice and Frederic Taber Cooper. London: Grant Richards, 1904. Chapter II: Hogarth and His Times.

On the development of English caricature which was destined to be guided by the "giant genius" of Hogarth. However, his best work was done on the social rather than on the political side.


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SELWYN BRINTON, "The Comedy of Vice" .

Chapter II of Selwyn Brinton's The Eighteenth Century in English Caricature (London: A. Siegle, 1904) deals with "the pictured comedies of William Hogarth", showing that his art is generally directed to some moral purpose, but "in other subjects—where the moral lesson is either absent or less intrusive—the man's fancy runs absolutely riot in humorous observation."


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Old And Sold: Hogarth As Artist, Chronicler, And Moralist.

Originally published as part of George Elliot Anstruther's William Hogarth (London: George Bell & Sons. 1902). See also this online version of Anstruther's book.


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Vic Gatrell, London and the Pleasure Principle: Tate Britain Hogarth Exhibition, Symposium 9 February 2007.

The author endeavours to show that Hogarth isn't, in our modern sense, "comic", that his scenes of London are heavily loaded with allegorical meaning, that there is next to no warmth or generosity in his work and that even his humour was cruel. It is further explained that the purposes, meanings, and tone of later Georgian and Regency satire changed utterly, being no longer didactic and becoming increasingly personalised, less theatrical, less informal in expression and more fluid in execution.


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Artble: William Hogarth.

Hogarth page including a brief biography, but also dealing with the artistic context and the artist's style, technique and influences. Part of an encyclopedic webpage where you can find unique information about artists from many different art periods.


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John D. Tatter, "Satiric and Social Painting: Hogarth, Watteau, and Fragonard".

Illustrations of, and commentaries on, Hogarth's Self Portrait with Pug and the Marriage A-la-Mode paintings. Click on the small images to enlarge.


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Archive for the "The Horrible Hogarth" Category.

"The Horrible Hogarth" Web site, including a somewhat unorthodox, though very interesting, reading of Marriage A-la-Mode, which primarily deals with the sexual innuendo within the series. Part of a blog by Anthony Samuelson.


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Steven Zucker and Beth Harris, "William Hogarth, Marriage a-la-Mode", Smarthistory, 11 December 2015.

Talk about the six paintings of Marriage A-la-Mode.


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National Gallery, London: Hogarth, William.

Some brief remarks on Hogarth's life plus illustrations of, and commentaries on, The Graham Children; The Shrimp Girl; and the six paintings of the Marriage A-la-Mode series.


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Tate Britain: William Hogarth.

Hogarth's works in London's Tate Britain.


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George P. Landow: "The Influence of William Hogarth on Pre-Raphaelite Integrated Symbolism."

Shows that both William Holman Hunt and Hogarth successfully combined realism with elaborate iconography and the use of the written word to clarify the meaning of their images. Also deals with the parallels between Hunt and Hogarth.


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Joe Gollner, "The Satiric Art of William Hogarth" (1987).

Compares three examples of Hogarth's work: The Wollaston Family; The Good Samaritan; and the first plate of A Rake's Progress.


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Jonathan Jones, "Hogarth's anti-progress: how the father of British painting went missing from our galleries", The Guardian, 24 October 2014.

The author laments that the scathing satirist William Hogarth put Britain's painters on the map, but on the 250th anniversary of his death one had a hard time seeing his work.


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Terence Bowers, "Hogarth's Peregrination, Chorography, and the Representation of England."

Abstract of a paper read at Writing the Journey: A Conference on American, British and Anglophone Travel Writers and Writing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 10-13 June 1999.


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Annie Richardson, "Hogarth and the aesthetics of dance".

Abstract of a paper read at the Dance Symposium, "So Publick an Approbation": Attitudes to dance in eighteenth-century England, New College, Oxford, 26 April 2000. See also the author's article, "An Aesthetics of Performance: Dance in Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty".


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London's Street Noises: The Enraged Musician by William Hogarth.

Posted by Vic. Part of Jane Austen's World, a blog that brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive, but also contains details about Georgian London.


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The Norton Anthology of English Literature: A Day in Eighteenth-Century London: Texts and Contexts: William Hogarth, The Enraged Musician.

Part of The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Topics, an excellent site prepared by Lawrence Lipking.


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Werner Busch, "Die englische Kunst des 18. Jahrhunderts", in Kunst: die Geschichte ihrer Funktionen, Weinheim, 1987, 637-673.

Survey of English art of the eighteenth century. Includes a section on Hogarth.


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Werner Busch, "Die Kunst der Aufklärung in gesamteuropäischer Perspektive", in Die Kunst der Aufklärung - The Art of the Enlightenment, Beijing, 2011-2012.

German article on European art of the Enlightenment. Includes a discussion of Hogarth's borrowings from traditional religious art.


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Michael Dean, "William Hogarth and Georgian Life", History Today, 24 September 2012.

Short article on Hogarth's life as a microcosm of the three main themes of Georgian life: money, the home and sex.


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Arts Council: William Hogarth (1697-1764), "The Christening" (or "Orator Henley Christening a Child").

Brief description of one of Hogarth's early paintings showing a christening taking place in the interior of a wealthy home. The painting is in good condition, but may have been slightly reduced on the right hand side at some earlier point in its history.


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A Harlot's Progress.

Commentary on Hogarth's Harlot series by art historian Neil McWilliam.


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An Election Series 1753-1754.

Commentary on Hogarth's Election series by Neil McWilliam.


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William Hogarth: A brief history of William Hogarth's paintings at St. Bartholomew's Hospital (by Marion Hill, Archivist, Barts) and diagnosis of the sick depicted in the Pool of Bethesda (by Prof David Lowe).

Short information on Hogarth's paintings for the Grand Staircase in the North Wing of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, focusing on The Pool of Bethesda.


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William Hogarth: The artist behind the Barts staircase paintings.

Another page on Hogarth's The Good Samaritan and Christ at the Pool of Bethesda - biblical scenes that illustrate caring and healing. "Hogarth may have used patients from Barts wards as models for the crowd of sick and injured people around the pool."


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Jonathan Jones, "Hogarth's The Shrimp Girl (c1745)", Guardian Unlimited, 15 September 2001.

Interprets the unknown street-seller in Hogarth's oil sketch as a lively personification of London.


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William Hogarth, Beer Street and Gin Lane, two prints.

Part of a British Museum site providing short commentaries on, and images of, Hogarth's prints. Related pages include information on William Hogarth's gold admission ticket to Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens; The Bad Taste of the Town; A Rake's Progress, plate 8; Characters and Caricaturas; an unfinished proof engraving of Gulielmus Hogarth; Plate II of Marriage A-la-Mode, and The Idle 'Prentice betrayed by his Whore and taken in a night cellar with his accomplice, illustrating different stages in the creative process involved in making one of the twelve prints in Hogarth's series, Industry and Idleness.


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Beer Street (1750-1751), Gin Lane (1750-1751); The Analysis of Beauty, Plate I (1753).

Commentaries on these prints by Neil McWilliam.


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Ernest L. Abel, "Gin Lane: did Hogarth know about fetal alcohol syndrome?"

Online version of an article first published in Alcohol and Alcoholism, 36, No. 2 (2001), 131-34. Demonstrates that claims about Hogarth's awareness of the stigmata of the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in his print Gin Lane are unfounded, though the 'gin epidemic' in eighteenth-century London undoubtedly resulted in the increased birth of weak and sickly children.


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daily LUSH: Gin Lane by William Hogarth.

Brief discussion of England's Gin Fever depicted in Gin Lane.


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Gin Lane vs Beer Street.

Article published in The Economist, 26 October 2014, demonstrating both the artist's humour and his heartfelt concern for his fellow Londoners.


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Elizabeth Hoyt, "Gin, Hogarth, and the Horrible Crime of Judith Dufour" .

Suggests that the melodramatic main scene in Gin Lane is probably based on a real one: the case of Judith Dufour.


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Max Pemberton, "William Hogarth's Gin Lane has a lesson for binge-drinking Britain", The Telegraph, 30 December 2012.

Demonstrates that the gin craze of the first half of the eighteenth century, which prompted Hogarth's 1751 prints Gin Lane and Beer Street, has many similarities to the current problems we face with the epidemic of binge drinking.


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William Hogarth: "Beer Street and Gin Lane", kammermusikkammer.blogspot.de (2013).

Detailed German discussion of Beer Street and Gin Lane, based on Berthold Hinz, William Hogarth: Beer Street and Gin Lane: Lehrtafeln zur britischen Volkswohlfahrt (Frankfurt am Main, 1984).


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Jonathan Jones, "How a William Hogarth painting predicted Brexit 250 years ago", The Guardian, 14 June 2016.

On Hogarth's painting The Gate of Calais (O The Roast Beef of Old England) (1748), which can help us understand what is going on in the mind of the Brexit-leaning public.


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The Marriage Contract (1733); The Pool of Bethesda (1736); The Country Dance (1745); Moses Brought before Pharaoh's Daughter (1746); Calais Gate, or O The Roast Beef of Old England (1748); The March to Finchley (1749-50); Sigismunda (1759); The Lady's Last Stake (1758-59); Paul before Felix (1748).

Brief analyses of all these paintings by Neil McWilliam.


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Portraits: Miss Mary Edwards (1742).

Commentaries by Neil McWilliam on this portrait and Hogarth's Captain Coram. See also the commentaries on other portraits, such as Sarah Malcolm (1732), David Garrick in the Character of Richard III (1745) and David Garrick and his Wife (1757); or Hogarth's Servants and Francis Matthew Schutz in his Bed.


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Family portraits and Conversation Pieces.

Commentaries by Neil McWilliam and David Bindman on The Graham Children (1742); The Cholmondeley Family (1732); The Woodes Rogers Family (1729); and The Wollaston Family (1730). See also the commentaries on The Christening; The Denunciation; Lord Hervey and his Friends; The Fountaine Family; The Wedding of Stephen Beckingham and Mary Cox; and The House of Cards; or An Assembly at Wanstead House and A Scene from 'The Conquest of Mexico'.


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10 Artworks By William Hogarth You Should Know.

Short commentaries by Helen Armitage on Beer Street and Gin Lane, A Harlot's Progress. Marriage A-la-Mode, The Painter and his Pug, Four Times of the Day, An Election, The Four Stages of Cruelty, The Graham Children, The Shrimp Girl and O the Roast Beef of Old England (‘The Gate of Calais’).


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Reason and Fantasy in an age of enlightenment: William Hogarth: A Harlot's Progress.

Brief commentaries on the six prints of A Harlot's Progress. Part of a Web site by the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


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Allen Memorial Art Museum: Collection: William Hogarth, Portrait of Theodore Jacobsen.

Detailed information on Hogarth's portrait of Theodore Jacobsen, a successful merchant and amateur architect who was, like Hogarth, a staunch supporter of the Foundling Hospital in London.


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William Hogarth, Portrait of Daniel Lock (1762).

Brief information about this specific portrait. From A Handbook of the Collection, The Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


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Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Hogarth: behind the portraits.

Presents the biographies of some of Hogarth's sitters, associates, and well-known figures from the period. "Read the lives behind the portraits for a glimpse of Hogarth's world."


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"Election Campaigning Now and Then,"The Web of Time: Pages from the American Past, Volume 3, Number 1.

Short article from the magazine of American history, archaeology, antique collecting, museum exhibits, and related travel destinations. Offers brief descriptions of the Election pictures and demonstrates how far we have come since Hogarth recorded the British parliamentary election at Oxford in 1754.


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Caroline Parkes, "Art as a Representation of Resistance", in Slave Resistance: A Caribbean Study, section "Art Representations of Resistance."

Part of a Web site created by students of the University of Miami who took, as their group project, the Spring 2000 edition of History 300: Caribbean: Slavery and Resistance. Deals with William Blake's portrayals of punished slaves and Hogarth's depiction of blacks in plates 2 and 4 of A Harlot's Progress and in Morning. Concludes, in line with David Dabydeen's Hogarth's Blacks, that "Hogarth used the African to call into question the foundation of British and colonial society. He highlighted the moral corruption, that took place under the establishment of the colonies and slavery - and the consequences this new found wealth had on British society." Click on the essay, "Art as a Representation of Resistance".


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Audrey Shafer: Hogarth, William, Marriage à la Mode (3): The Visit to the Quack Doctor.

Deals with the third scene of Marriage A-la-Mode from a medical point of view.


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William Hogarth.

Short commentaries on A Harlot's Progress, A Rake's Progress, Marriage A-la-Mode, Noon, Enthusiasm Delineated and Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism, and The Times, Plate I, all borrowed from other Internet sources.


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The British Museum: factsheet: William Hogarth (1697-1764).

Short account of Hogarth's career as a painter and engraver. Also includes some notes on the British Museum collection of Hogarth's drawings and prints.


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Carmela Thiele, "William Hogarth: Außenseiter mit exzentrischem Humor", Deutschlandfunk, 26 October 2014.

Text of a short radio feature produced on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of Hogarth's death and dealing with the artist's life, his "modern moral subjects" and the Engraver's Copyright Act.


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William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764, A Scene from The Beggar's Opera, 1728/1729.

Notes on Hogarth's picture presented by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. From the Tour: British and American History Paintings of the 1700s. See also Biography, Bibliography and Exhibition History.


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Gemma Sykes, "William Hogarth: 'Mr Garrick in the character of Richard III'", Finding Shakespeare, 7 June 2016.

Discussion of Hogarth's portrait of the actor David Garrick in the Character of Richard III, "awakening from his horrifying dream in Act 5, Scene 3, in which he sees a parade of the ghosts of his murder victims."


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Charles Harrison Wallace, "Hogarth, Monamy, and The Connoisseur".

On the picture, Monamy the Painter showing a Sea-piece to Mr Walker, said to be painted by Hogarth and Peter Monamy. Part of a site which gives a full account of the life and work of Peter Monamy (1681-1749), painter of marine subjects.


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melbourneblogger: William Hogarth, English pride and 18th century gallophobia.

Discusses some of Hogarth's paintings and prints that are related to the Jacobite rebellion, but were executed AFTER the Jacobites had been defeated.


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The Art Fund: search results for William Hogarth.

"Art Fund" page, listing several paintings by Hogarth. The Art Fund is the UK's largest arts charity. Its mission is to save art that would otherwise disappear from public museums and galleries in the UK.


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John Johnson Collection Exhibition 2001: Ellis Gamble. [Goldsmith]. (William Hogarth) (c. 1724 or 1728).

Brief information on Hogarth's trade card for Ellis Gamble. See also the commentaries on the forgery or (rejected) proof of Hogarth's own trade card from the same collection.


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William Hogarth's Night.

Masonic page presenting a copy after Hogarth's Night, engraved by Charles Spooner. Says that "George W. Speth suggests that the picture is of Hartshorn Lane, Charing Cross".


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Hogarth and marine painters.

Part of a Web site by the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Shows that Hogarth, Governor of the Foundling Hospital and a friend of sea captain Thomas Coram, certainly knew the new generation of British marine painters.


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Crystal Smith, "Watteau and Hogarth: A Romantic and an Entertainer". Suite101.com (15 March 2011).

Thoughts about Hogarth and Watteau, showing that both artists had extremely different styles and ideas about their artwork. See also Philip Nightingale, "Painter William Hogarth 1697-1764".


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Kathleen Duffy, "Visit William Hogarth's House in Turnham Green, Chiswick, London".

Description of a visit to Hogarth's house in Chiswick, including some photographs taken by the author.


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Antiques of the Orient: William Hogarth.

Short remarks on Hogarth's life and work. Part of a Singapore antiquarian's site.








ONLINE EXHIBITIONS AND REVIEWS OF MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS ON WILLIAM HOGARTH:




Angela Rosenthal (curator), William Hogarth and Eighteenth-Century Print Culture, exh., Mary and Leigh Block Gallery, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, 17 April-22 June 1997.
Online exhibition critically reassessing the satirical graphic work of Hogarth by highlighting a variety of eighteenth-century themes, e.g. Hogarth's deep concern with the ills of the modern city, the dignity of and the dangers faced by prostitutes, and issues of theatricality, race, class, and taste. For the accompanying programmes and events, see also Hogarth and 18th-Century Print Culture Exhibition Events.


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James Christen Steward (curator), Hogarth and His Times: Serious Comedy, Berkeley Art Museum, University of California, 1998.

Survey of the exhibition organised to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Hogarth's birth.


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Haley & Steele presents: William Hogarth (1697-1764).

Cached version of an American printseller's site on Hogarth, focusing on the prints. The original site is now closed. It included illustrations and descriptions of many plates and information about the different states and editions of Hogarth's engravings. The commentaries were provided by Edward Hammonds.


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Tate Britain: Hogarth Exhibition (2007): Room Guide.

Room guide to the most comprehensive exhibition of Hogarth's paintings and prints in a generation, showcasing every aspect of the artist's multi-faceted career: his remarkable paintings, ranging from elegant conversation pieces to salacious brothel scenes; his vibrant drawings and sketches; and the numerous satirical engravings for which he is most famous today.

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Jenny Uglow, "The great showman", The Guardian, 13 January 2007.

Review of the great Hogarth exhibition at Tate Britain, London, 7 February to 29 April 2007. Inspired by the satire of Swift and Fielding, and the mixture of tragedy and comedy in Shakespeare, Hogarth was the most literary and theatrical of painters, writes Jenny Uglow.


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Richard Dorment, "Finding the fun and frolics in Hogarth," Daily Telegraph, 6 February 2007.

Article dealing with Tate Britain's comprehensive exhibition of Hogarth's paintings and prints, giving a brief review of his life and work. The author sees Hogarth as "a high-spirited chronicler of extraordinary times," who was able "to recall a scene at will" and "painted straight on to the canvas so that nothing stood between him and the fluent, spontaneous application of paint."


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Brian Sewell, "Hogarth the Ham-Fisted," Evening Standard, 9 February 2007.

Overly critical analysis of Hogarth's art on the occasion of the major exhibition at the Tate Britain, London. The author abandons his former "view of Hogarth as 'a painter's painter' ... who lifted English art out of the rut of portraiture, set it on the course of history painting based on Shakespeare and Milton (...) and determined that every painting should tell a moral story of some sort, ... that Hogarth was a man who understood the nature of oil paint as a material of virtue in itself, ... that he let the paint flow from the brush in such a way that throughout his work there was a spontaneity of touch, a painterliness that was as customary and masterly as the touch of Watteau, Lancret and Pater." Actually, with his superficial common sense rooted in blind anger rather than reason, Hogarth "was a propagandist who could not discern the causes of those aspects of society against which he raged. Concerned only with the consequences of all that he condemned, his oratorical preaching - for that is what it was - immediately became an over-emphatic rant in his crude insistence on excessive and repetitive detail to reinforce a point."


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Adrian Searle, "The fun of filth," Guardian Unlimited, Tuesday February 6, 2007.

On Tate Britain's new exhibition, recently shown at the Louvre, which "brings the printmaker and the painter together, covering the entirety of Hogarth's career." According to the author, Hogarth's world "is rich, rude, teeming with life - and wonderfully familiar."


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Jonathan Jones, "Tunnel vision," Guardian Unlimited, Tuesday January 23, 2007.

On Hogarth's Francophobic imaginings and on the Louvre's decision "to display British art with the respect it gets in American museums or at Russia's Hermitage."


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24 Hour Museum: Graham Spice, "FIRST MAJOR HOGARTH DISPLAY FOR 30 YEARS COMES TO TATE BRITAIN."

On the darkly satirical world of Hogarth's London at Tate Britain. The show brings together "a wide and cleverly displayed range of his works from all periods of his 40-year career, many borrowed from collections around the world."


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Michéle C. Cone, "Sexual Mores".

On the Hogarth exhibition at the Louvre, focusing on the artist's self-portraits and narrative series.


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About Tate: Press Office: Press Releases: Hogarth.

Commentary on the major exhibition of Hogarth's work which opened at Tate Britain on 7 February 2007. This exhibition includes over 200 works and showcases every aspect of Hogarth's multi-faceted career: his remarkable paintings, ranging from elegant conversation pieces to salacious brothel scenes.


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York art historian puts Hogarth in the spotlight.

On Mark Hallett's major role in conceiving and organising the layout of the "most comprehensive exhibition of Hogarth's work for a generation" at Tate Britain.


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Christie Davies enjoys the erotic romps daringly portrayed by the artists of eighteenth century France and Hogarth's denunciations of them as unspeakable French filth: The Triumph of Eros at the Hermitage Rooms and Hogarth at Tate Britain.

Review of two exhibitions: (1) The Triumph of Eros: Art and Seduction in 18th Century France, Hermitage Rooms at Somerset House, London, 24 November 2005 - 8 April 2007, and (2) Hogarth, Tate Britain, London, 7 February - 29 April 2007.


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Richard Dorment, "A fascinating failure", Daily Telegraph, 23 August 2000.

Overly critical review of Marcia Pointon's exhibition, Hogarth's 'Sigismunda' in focus, Tate Britain, London, 24 July-4 November 2000. "Despite Tate Britain's irritatingly glib presentation of the work, Richard Dorment discovers an illuminating story behind one of Hogarth's least successful paintings."


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Richard Dorment, Hogarth's Marriage A-la-Mode, National Gallery, 15 October 1997 - 18 January 1998.

Perceptive review of the National Gallery exhibition curated by Judy Egerton. Emphasises Hogarth's maturity as a painter in creating the six Marriage A-la-Mode paintings.


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William Hogarth, 1697 - 1764.

Review of an exhibition of Hogarth's works at Tate Britain, London, 27 October 2014 - 26 April 2015, and the Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, 16 May - 31 August 2015, marking the 250th anniversary of the artist's death.


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Peter Watts, "Lust, gin and grime: 'Hogarth's London' at the Cartoon Museum", Apollo, 7 November 2014.

Review of an exhibition of fifty of Hogarth's best-known London satirical prints at London's Cartoon Museum, 22 October 2014 - 18 January 2015.


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Martin Oldham, "Rise and Fall: 'Progress' at The Foundling Museum", Apollo, 17 June 2014.

Review of an exhibition at London's Foundling Museum on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of Hogarth's death, showing four contemporary artists responding to Hogarth's A Rake's Progress.


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Vices of Life: The Prints of William Hogarth.

Review of an exhibition of Hogarth's prints at Frankfurt's Städel Museum, 10 June - 6 September 2015.


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Christian Thomas, "Tollhausgemachte Ausschweifungen", Frankfurter Rundschau, 9 June 2015.

German review of the exhibition of some 70 of Hogarth's prints at the Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, curated by Annett Gerlach.


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Hans-Bernd Heier, " 'Laster des Lebens' von William Hogarth im Städel Museum: Bilderzählungen voller Drastik, Tragik und Komik", FeuilletonFrankfurt: Das Online Magazin von Erhard Metz.

Another German review of the exhibition of Hogarth's prints at the Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main.


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William Hogarth: A Harlot’s Progress and Other Stories.

Review of an exhibition of Hogarth's prints at the Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, 14 April - 7 August 2016.


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Harvard University Art Museums Press Releases: Fogg Exhibition Examines Printmaker William Hogarth's Treatment of Execution.

Review of Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell's exhibition, Death by Hogarth, which was on display at the Fogg Art Museum from 8 May through 18 July, 1999. It examined the execution theme in Hogarth's prints from three points of view: as performance, as death sentenced on official order, and as the process of following a plan through to its natural end - with an emphasis on images related to hanging. For more details, see the catalogue of this exhibition.


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Chandra Speeth, "Subversion and wit, 18th-century style", The Yale Herald Online, 1997.

Review of the exhibition, Among the Whores and Thieves: William Hogarth and "The Beggar's Opera", Yale Center for British Art, 1997. See also Yale Bulletin & Calendar News Stories. There is also a catalogue of this exhibition, edited by David Bindman.


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Janaki Ranpura, "Art Review BAC exhibit explores England's darker side" (7 February 1997).

Another review of the Yale Center exhibition, Among the Whores and Thieves.


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William Zimmer, "Money, Lawyers and the First P.M." The New York Times, 23 February 1997.

New York Times review of the same exhibition.


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William Wilson, "ART REVIEW: Hogarth's Women--Some People of Real Dimension", Los Angeles Times, 2 October 1995.

Los Angeles Times review of Patricia Crown's exhibition, "Depictions of Women by William Hogarth and His Contemporaries.", The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1995.


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Jonathan Jones, "Artists at the Hustings", Sir John Soane's Museum, London. Guardian Unlimited, 4 April 2001.

Review of the exhibition, Hogarth's Election Entertainment: Artists at the Hustings (Sir John Soane's Museum, 23 March - 25 August 2001), based on the four paintings of Hogarth's Election series. The same exhibition was shown at the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle, 6 October 2001 - 6 January 2002.


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William Hogarth: Conversation Piece, Pallant House Gallery, 18 January - 9 March 2003.

This exhibition considered Hogarth's bawdy print series An Election in relation to his The Beggar's Opera Act III, the 'conversation' painting that made his reputation.


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William Hogarth: British Satirical Prints, Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, 7 February-13 April 2008.

Leaflet providing information about the artist and the prints presented in the exhibition, "William Hogarth: British Satirical Prints".


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8 July 2008: Cautionary Tales - William Hogarth, National Library of New Zealand.

Exhibition of more than 50 of Hogarth's witty, subversive and often riotously humorous prints, all drawn from the collections of the Alexander Turnbull Library.


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Gerald Isaaman, "When Gin Lane was the road to mother's ruin", Camden New Journal, 18 September 2003.

Review of an exhibition held to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the British Museum, which was founded in 1753. There is also a catalogue by Sheila O'Connell on this exhibition.


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Jonathan Heawood, "London, city of sin and gin...", The Observer, 1 June, 2003.

Another review of the British Museum exhibition on mid-eighteenth-century London. Hogarth's images are central to this exhibition. They show protagonists such as the "prostitutes, fops, apprentices and artists" who where "repeatedly swung over the wheel of fate, falling from the bright lights of the West End to the dark cells of Newgate and Bedlam."


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Art Critic London: "Streets of shame: 'London 1753'. British Museum, 020 7323 8299, until Nov 23".

Another review of the British Museum exhibition depicting London in 1753 and dominated by Hogarth's horrifying, squalor-filled images.


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Lisa Small, "William Hogarth's Election series", Brooklyn Museum, 2012.

On the four Election series prints (published in 1757-58 and based on his paintings dated 1754-55), in which Hogarth turned his attention from the squalor of urban life to the corruption of the political world.


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Hogarth to Hockney: A Rake's Progress.

Short information about a Whitworth Art Gallery exhibition, 6 October 2012 - 3 February 2013, showing both David Hockney's and Hogarth's print series, A Rake's Progress.


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Blake Gopnik, "At Pittsburgh's Frick, William Hogarth Shows His Chops as a Painter", artnet news, 17 November 2015.

On the portrait of the Honorable John Hamilton, showing that "Hogarth the caricaturist was also hugely skilled at making high-end, undistorted realist portraits."


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Javier Docampo, "British Satirical Prints: Hogarth and His Age".

Survey of the Spanish exhibition, La estampa satírica británica: Hogarth y su tiempo, Biblioteca Nacional, 1 February - 1 April 2001.


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Rafael Sierra, "William Hogarth, el abuelo de los 'Spitting Image': La Biblioteca Nacional reúne en una exposición a los artistas británicos más mordaces y los enfrenta a Goya", El Mundo, 13, No. 4082 (1 February 2001).

Spanish review of the exhibition of British satirical prints at the Biblioteca Nacional, curated by Javier Docampo (see above).


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William Hogarth (1697–1764) - Londons Laster, Kunsthalle Bremen, 21 May - 17 August 2014.

Commentary on a German exhibition of Hogarth's engravings at the Kunsthalle Bremen on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the artist's death.


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William Hogarth - Dirne, Wüstling und eine moderne Ehe.

Commentary on a German exhibition at the Hamburger Kunsthalle which closed in January 2003. Prints from four series were shown: A Harlot's Progress, A Rake's Progress, Marriage A-la-Mode and The Four Times of the Day.


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Fanny Gonella / Christoph Heinrich, "William Hogarth: Dirne, Wüstling und eine moderne Ehe, bis 17. November 2002, Hegewisch-Kabinett".

Notes on the German exhibition of Hogarth's engravings at the Hamburger Kunsthalle.


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Maike Schiller, "Kunstvolle Sticheleien: AUSSTELLUNG. William Hogarths Kupferstiche im Hegewisch-Kabinett der Kunsthalle", Hamburger Abendblatt, 19 August 2002.

Review of the exhibition of Hogarth's works at the Hamburger Kunsthalle.


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Jens Bisky, "Eine häßliche Welt in schönen Formen: Die Berliner Nationalgalerie zeigt Hogarths 'Marriage à-la-mode' und Werke seiner Bewunderer", Berliner Zeitung, 19 December 1998.

German review of the exhibition, Marriage A-la-Mode: Hogarth und seine deutschen Bewunderer, Altes Museum, Berlin, 18 December 1998-28 February 1999, which was also shown at the Städel, Frankfurt. There is a well-illustrated catalogue of this exhibition, including essays by Judy Egerton, Werner Busch, Karl Arndt, Claude Keisch, Martina Dillmann, and others.


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Christina Tilmann, Lob des Lasters: Erstmals kompletter Hogarth-Zyklus "Marriage à-la-mode" im Alten Museum Berlin, Der Tagesspiegel, 18 December 1998.

Another review of the Berlin Marriage A-la-Mode exhibition.


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"On Campus: Exhibition Looks at Hogarth Prints of the 18th Century London Stage", News@UW-Madison, 15 April 1997.

Brief review of Andrew Stevens's exhibition, Hogarth and the Shows of London, Elvehjem Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Brittingham Gallery VII, 26 April-29 June 1997. On performances of The Beggar's Opera and a lecture accompanying the same exhibition when shown at The Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, 7 November 1996-1 January 1997, see also "18th-Century Hogarth Theater Prints Come to Reed", Reed College Press Release, 8 October 1996.


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TWO EXHIBITIONS, 270 YEARS APART, TAKE ON THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY AT THE CROCKER ART MUSEUM.

Excerpt from a page including a commentary on The London Observer: Engravings by William Hogarth, an exhibition of over 50 prints by Hogarth shown at the Crocker Art Museum, 12 July - 22 September 2002.


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William Hogarth: Proceed with Caution, exhibition, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas, 6 October 2012-20 January 2013.

Exhibition bringing together a selection of the artist's most important eighteenth-century series including Marriage A-la-Mode, A Rake's Progress, and Industry and Idleness, "each intended to evoke several layers of society."


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Veit Heinrich, "Urvater des Comic strip: Das Kupferstichkabinett Dresden zeigt Grafik von William Hogarth", Berliner Zeitung, 14 December 1995.

Brief review of the German exhibition, Von Wüstlingen und anderen Zeitgenossen, Kupferstichkabinett Dresden, 9 November 1995 - 2 February 1996.


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Simon Barker-Benfield, "William Hogarth's satirical vision of 18th-century England" (The Florida Times-Union, 4 May 2000).

Some remarks on Hogarth and particularly the first scene of Marriage A-la-Mode which forms part of the exhibition, Parody and Politics: The World of William Hogarth (1697-1764) at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.


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William Hogarth: Printmaker.

Some remarks on a Courtauld Gallery exhibition, 23 February - 13 May 2001.


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Kunsthaus Zürich: Karikaturen: Von Hogarth bis Daumier.

Brief information on an exhibition of works by Hogarth, some Swiss caricaturists, and Daumier in the Kunsthaus Zurich, 16 February-22 April 2001.








REVIEWS OF BOOKS DEALING WITH HOGARTH:




David Chandler, "Jenny Uglow, Hogarth: A Life and a World, London: Faber and Faber, 1997", Romanticism On the Net, 8 (November 1997).
Calls Jenny Uglow's book a "vivid and enthralling biography" of Hogarth and "a vibrant portrait of the age in which he lived".


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Bruce Cook, "Artist a la Mode", Washington Post, 9 November 1997.

Review of Jenny Uglow's Hogarth. Says that the book "welcomes the reader; it is thoroughly researched, yet written with great enthusiasm for that mad, crude, besotted age and a great affection for the man who pictured it so well in all its grim glory".


* * *



Michael Kimmelman, "An 18th-Century Paparazzo: A biography of Hogarth examines the art and times of the engraver and painter", The New York Times, 30 November 1997.

Another review of Jenny Uglow, Hogarth: A Life and a World (1997).


* * *



Paint job: Hogarth, by Jenny Uglow (Faber, £20), Guardian Unlimited, 29 June, 2002.

Review by Veronica Horwell.


* * *



Thomas W. Rieger, "David Bindman, Hogarth and his Times: Serious Comedy. Exhibition catalogue. London, British Museum, Sept, 26, 1997 - Jan, 4, 1998; Berkeley Art Museum, University of California, Jan - Apr, 1998; Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, June - Aug, 1998; New York, Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, Sept - Nov, 1998. Berkeley, Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1997. Prolepsis: The Tübingen Review of English Studies, 2 February 1999.

Review of David Bindman's British Museum catalogue of 1997.


* * *



W[illiam] A[rthur] Speck, "Prints in Perspective", H-Albion, H-Net Reviews, May 2000.

Review of Mark Hallett, The Spectacle of Difference: Graphic Satire in the Age of Hogarth, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1999.


* * *



J. H. Baron, "From Hogarth to Rowlandson: Medicine in Art in Eighteenth Century Britain", British Medical Journal, 314 (22 March 1997).

Review of Fiona Haslam, From Hogarth to Rowlandson: Medicine in Art in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1996.


* * *



Helmut Hirsch, "Zerklärungen und skandaleuse Excursionen", Berliner LeseZeichen, 4 (2000).

Review of Wolfgang Promies (ed.), Lichtenbergs Hogarth: Die Kalender-Erklärungen von Georg Christoph Lichtenberg mit den Nachstichen von Ernst Ludwig Riepenhausen zu den Kupferstich-Tafeln von William Hogarth, Munich: Carl Hanser, 1999. It should be noted that these early Hogarth commentaries by Lichtenberg are not identical with the better known, and more detailed, descriptions in his Ausführliche Erklärung der Hogarthischen Kupferstiche.


* * *



Bernd Krysmanski, "Lichtenbergs Hogarth. Die Kalender-Erklärungen von Georg Christoph Lichtenberg mit den Nachstichen von Ernst Ludwig Riepenhausen zu den Kupferstich-Tafeln von William Hogarth. Herausgegeben von Wolfgang Promies, München; Wien: Carl Hanser Verlag 1999." Server Frühe Neuzeit / KUNSTFORM, 2 (1 December 2000).

Short, revised Online version of a lengthy review which appeared in the Lichtenberg-Jahrbuch 1999, 257-68.


* * *



G. Sertoli, "L'analisi della bellezza", L'Indice del 1999, n. 06

Review of C. Maria Laudando's modern Italian translation of Hogarth's Analysis of Beauty.


* * *



Martin Heusser, "Re-reading 18th-century Prints", Interactions - The Bulletin of I.A.W.I.S., No. 16 (April 1996).

Review of Peter Wagner, Reading Iconotexts: From Swift to the French Revolution, London: Reaktion Books, 1995.


* * *



Tissues of Allusions: Reading Iconotexts, A Review By Leonard Rifas, TCJ [The Comics Journal], No. 188 (July 1996), 27.

Another review of Wagner's book.


* * *



Alvan Bregman, "Hogarth's Christian Doctrine".

Review of Ronald Paulson's Hogarth's Harlot: Sacred Parody in Enlightenment England (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003).


* * *



Kate Grandjouan, "Hogarth's Hidden Parts: Satiric Allusion, Erotic Wit, Blasphemous Bawdiness and Dark Humour in Eighteenth-Century English Art", Eighteenth-Century Studies, 45, no. 2 (2012), 335-36.

Critical review of Bernd Krysmanski's book which aims to turn the idea of the "good" Hogarth on its head, questions Hogarth's moralizing agendas and argues instead that he was a "bawdy hedonist," a malicious blasphemer, possibly even a pedophile. According to Grandjouan, "the author covers a large amount of material with efficacy. […] Scholars with an interest in the 'everything and anything' of Hogarthian scholarship may well find the publication useful."


* * *



Sean Shesgreen, "Hogarth's Hidden Parts: Satiric Allusion, Erotic Wit, Blasphemous Bawdiness and Dark Humour in Eighteenth-Century English Art by Bernd W. Krysmanski", The Scriblerian, 45, no. 2 (Spring 2013), 260-262.

Another review of Krysmanski's book. According to Shesgreen, "Hogarth's Hidden Parts is a volume of immense scholarship, based on exhaustive and thoughtful readings in the literature of art and social history (…). It is also a study of great breadth, both in the works Mr. Krysmanski analyzes and in the themes he treats, making it a small encyclopedia on Hogarth (as weIl as on his aesthetic and literary relationships). It is particularly strong in locating Hogarth in the context of European art […]; in all, the volume offers 304 images, some of them arcane and difficult to find. The book is carefully and exhaustively indexed […]. In all these respects, Hogarth's Hidden Parts stands as a lively, iconoclastic commentary that must be consulted and reckoned with by any serious art historian."


* * *



Katherine Mannheimer, "Indexing the Indecorous in the Life and Work of William Hogarth", The Eighteenth Century, 54, no. 4 (Winter 2013), 559-564.

Review of the same volume. According to Mannheimer, "the book provides a treasure trove of raw material for scholars interested in the changing perceptions of sex, gender, and the body; the impact of urbanization, commodification, and secularization; and the intersection of high and low culture in the eighteenth century. […] Krysmanski's project of aggregating his motifs systematically, and of displaying them alongside other examples of the same motif (taken both from within and from outside Hogarth's own body of work) - in addition to his discovery (promised in the title) of hitherto unnoticed details - can result, at many points, in real revelations."


* * *



Angela Rosenthal, "Robert W. Jones, Gender and the Formation of Taste in Eighteenth-Century Britain: The Analysis of Beauty, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998," CAA [College Art Association] Reviews, 2000.

Review of a book which deals with eighteenth-century theories of beauty, among them Hogarth's.


* * *



Laura J. Gorfkle, "Paulson, Ronald, Don Quixote in England: The Aesthetics of Laughter, Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998", Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America, 19, no. 1 (1999), 145-49.

Review of Paulson's book which includes a chapter on Hogarth's Don Quixote illustrations and also discusses some other of his works.


* * *



Peter M. Briggs, "Paulson, Ronald, Don Quixote in England: The Aesthetics of Laughter", Bryn Mawr Review of Comparative Literature, 1, no. 1 (Summer 1999).

Another review of Paulson's Don Quixote book.


* * *



David Bindman, "Putting history into art history: on 18th-century British Art: Recent scholarship examines the social context", The Art Newspaper, 8 July 2016.

Review of David Solkin's Art in Britain 1660-1815 (Yale University Press, 2015).


* * *



Michael Dirda, "Beyond Lace and Frills", Washington Post, 9 November 1997.

Review of John Brewer, The Pleasures of the Imagination: English Culture in the Eighteenth Century, New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1997. See also the Online version of Chapter One of Brewer's book.


* * *



James Hopkin, "Mungo the master", Guardian Unlimited, 22 May 1999.

Review of David Dabydeen's novel, A Harlot's Progress.








COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, LECTURE RESOURCES, AND SOME OTHER EDUCATIONAL SITES:




Bonita Billman, William Hogarth and his World: 4 Sessions.
Outline of a course on Hogarth which may furnish some ideas for preparing similar academic courses.


* * *



Tate Britain: Hogarth teachers' pack.

Excellent teacher and student notes by Kirstie Beaven, including downloadable full colour A4 images with introductory information, discussion points, links and activities.


* * *



Silk, Squalor & Scandal: Hogarth's London at the Cuming Museum.

Short education resource pack intended as an introduction to the exhibition, "Silk, Squalor & Scandal, Hogarth's London" and some of its themes.


* * *



Hogarth's Eighteenth Century.

Course around the work of William Hogarth by Amy Witherbee, Department of English, Boston College. Students are asked to look beyond the apparent moral or purpose of Hogarth's works to find, identify, and explore the signifiers with which these works are packed. The course is structured in four units: "All the world’s a stage," "Adventure, commodity, and excess," "What kind of race?" and "On being committed: marriage and other institutions."


* * *



Clifford Armion, "La narrativité des 'progresses': Marriage à-la-mode", La Clé des Langues (Lyon).

French commentaries and questions concerning the Marriage A-la-Mode series. Part of an excellent Hogarth project by Clifford Armion, Professor of English at the Université de Lyon. "The primary aim of this project is to facilitate access to William Hogarth's works on the web and to create a coherent database for teachers and researchers."


* * *



HIS3118: Hogarth! The artist and his life in Georgian London 1697-1764.

Module representing a detailed investigation of the life and art of William Hogarth (1697-1764). Module leader: Professor Jeremy Boulton.


* * *



Maureen Harkin, Literary and Visual Culture in Eighteenth-Century Britain (incorporating a special unit on Women and the Visual Arts in Eighteenth-Century Britain).

Detailed description of an ASECS course which began "with Hogarth's prints, focusing on his visual style, his sense of his own and a general British ambivalence in relation to continental painterly traditions, and the way the prints 'read' ".


* * *



Emergence of Art Market in Eighteenth Century Britain.

Some individual contributions dealing with the emergence of the art market in eighteenth-century Britain through the work of Hogarth. Part of a website created by the Art Market wiki team, Cornell University.


* * *



English for art historians: William Hogarth, The Marriage Settlement.

Guidelines for an analysis of the painting and how to organise a commentary. See also William Hogarth, Self-portrait; William Hogarth, Marriage A-la-Mode, plate II, William Hogarth, Gin Lane, brush up your prepositions and Training for the exam L1.


* * *



The University of Arizona Museum of Art: ART/WRITE - William Hogarth.

Short biography and history plus writing exercises that apply the persuasive techniques used today in analyzing contemporary editorial cartoons to Hogarth's Marriage A-la-Mode series.


* * *



Philip Gambone, Satire in the 18th Century.

Part 6 of a Boston University Academy curriculum project deals with William Hogarth, particularly with his Rake’s Progress series.


* * *



Christina Payne and Harry Mount: British Art from Hogarth to Turner.

Student research at the School of Humanities, Oxford Brookes University, in order to write "an in-depth, 2500-word, essay on a single picture of your choice".


* * *



Tradition and Modernity.

Course at the Department of Art History and Theory, University of Essex, introducing to the study of art history at university level through an examination of the visual arts of 18th century England (and France).


* * *



Ruth Fleischmann, INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH PAINTING.

Course for MA or BA students at the University of Bielefeld (Summer 2005), offering a survey of English painting from the Middle Ages to the present. Hogarth is discussed as an Enlightenment artist.


* * *



Viktoria Schmidt-Linsenhoff, William Hogarth.

Brief information about a German seminar on Hogarth at the University of Trier (Summer 1999).


* * *



Sabine Mainberger: Medienwechsel und Kulturtransfer: Hogarth - Lichtenberg.

Reference to a German seminar on Hogarth and Lichtenberg at the Freie Universität Berlin (Summer 2001).


* * *



National Portrait Gallery: Education: Distance Learning: Canvas & Stretcher: William Hogarth's self-portrait.

Interesting educational site on the measurements of Hogarth's self-portrait of c. 1757 in the National Portrait Gallery, London.


* * *



Hogarth and His Times: Serious Comedy: A Guide for Students Recommended for grades 7-12.

Site created by the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum. Looks at some of Hogarth's prints showing alcoholic abuse, poverty, mental illness, and political corruption. Encourages the viewer to consider how Hogarth's perspective compares with the ways we look at the same things nowadays.


* * *



Perspective: Hogarth: Beer Street and Gin Lane.

Shows that "Beer Street puts into practice the rules of perspective", whereas in Gin Lane "two conflicting perspective schemes regulate the middle distance in a criss-cross pattern".


* * *



Glendon Mellow, "Find All the Absurdities!", Scientific American, 31 March 2013.

Invitation to spot all errors in Hogarth's Satire on False Perspective.


* * *



Hogarth Description.

Professor Richard Parker's instructions in writing a substantial paragraph on Hogarth's Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn. Part of an educational site on Advanced Composition for students of English at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania.


* * *



SBL Forum: Frank Ritchel Ames, "Critical Methods and Guarded Minds".

Article using Hogarth's The Graham Children to introduce critical methods of "biblical criticism".


* * *



Louvre: William Hogarth (1697-1764), The Graham Children.

Some interesting questions about the children depicted in Hogarth's painting.


* * *



William Warner, Lecture Resources: Hogarth and the Market.

Part of "Enlightenment Communications in England and America" (University of California, Santa Barbara, Winter 2000). Images of A Harlot's Progress and Marriage A-la-Mode plus three keys to Hogarth's success with his Progress pieces in outline. Gives additional information about the moral rhetoric of Hogarth's Progresses according to Henry Fielding.


* * *



Leighton Carter, "Hogarth and Fielding's New Genre in the Middle Ground".

Some questions about Hogarth's and Henry Fielding's new type of visual and written description, called "comic history".


* * *



Falsche Perspektive.

German description of the mistakes in perspective within Hogarth's Satire on False Perspective.


* * *



Hogarth's Print Sequences.

Some Web pages and books on Hogarth recommended for students of English. Resource list by Professor Richard Davies, Acadia University, Canada.


* * *



Franck Loiseau, Documents pour la classe: Marriage à la Mode (1743-45) - William Hogarth.

French remarks on Hogarth's Marriage A-la-Mode series plus some questions in English for use in schools.


* * *



Primary Teachers' Notes: 'The Graham Children' by William Hogarth (1697-1764).

PDF file including useful background information about the The Graham Children and the artist as well as some suggestions on using the painting in the primary classroom, ideas for activities and cross-curricular links.


* * *



Take One Picture: An Exhibition of Work by Primary Schools Based on Hogarth's 'The Graham Children'.

Exhibition of children's work based on Hogarth's The Graham Children, National Gallery, London, 5 May - 12 August 2001. See also this page and the students' work inspired by Hogarth's painting.








MISCELLANEOUS:




Literature and painting in England (CTU de Nancy 2).
Excerpts from a very extensive Web page by Jean-Louis Claret on English literature and painting. Includes chapters on the eighteenth century. The latter contains an interesting section on Hogarth. Text in English.


* * *



Reading Hogarth. By Ronald Paulson. Reply by Richard Dorment. New York Review of Books, 7 October 1993.

Letters in response to "An Exchange on Hogarth", New York Review of Books, 12 August 1993.


* * *



Valentina-Andreea Dimulescu, "The Masters of English Painting: Hogarth - Gainsborough - Constable".

Short history of British art by a Romanian author, primarily dealing with the Rococo period and Romanticism and with the lives and works of William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough and John Constable.


* * *



artelino - The Magic of Art: William Hogarth (1697-1764).

Short account of the artist's life and work plus some remarks on "Collecting William Hogarth Prints". There is also a German version of the same page.


* * *



In Development: William Hogarth Prints: Lifetime Editions & Print States.

On the changes that appear on different states of Hogarth's prints.


* * *



Austin Dobson, De Libris: Prose and Verse (1908).

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Dobson's De Libris: Prose and Verse. Includes many details on Hogarth and some of his contemporaries, such as John Wilkes, Alexander Pope and Jean André Rouquet, in the chapters "On Some Books And Their Associations", "Bramston's 'Man Of Taste' " and "M. Rouquet On The Arts", etc.


* * *



Catherine Imperatore, "Femininity, Materialism and Class in Eighteenth Century England".

Includes an interpretation of the disintegration and moral depravity of the materialistic couple in Hogarth's Marriage A-la-Mode.


* * *



Henry Fielding, Preface to Joseph Andrews (1742).

Identifies Hogarth as a comic history painter and argues that the low genre of caricature is greatly inferior to the true comedy of manners, to which both Fielding and Hogarth aspired.


* * *



Apocalypse Press: William Hogarth.

Printseller's commentaries on Hogarth's Enthusiasm Delineated, Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism, The Four Times of the Day, and the Distressed Poet.


* * *



Lüder H. Niemeyer, "Here even the End comes to an End: Indestructible though the two Cones for the "Analysis of Beauty": One of these here for the first Time."

Part of a German art dealer's commercial Web site. Includes some heavily textured commentaries on Hogarth's Tail Piece, or The Bathos (1764) and an annotated list of copies after this print. There is also a German version of the same page.


* * *



Neil Emmerson, "I Lost my Ass: Jeff Gibson, KUNST Gallery, Sydney, Nov-Dec, 1995."

Compares Hogarth's Rake's Progress series with Jeff Gibson's show of a series of 10, 3-coloured screen prints, 3 short video pieces and another 3 larger format, multi-coloured screen prints. Both artists reflect contemporary constructions of masculinity, "share ideas about popular culture, marketability and both use didactic strategies; albeit Hogarth's intention was to instruct while Gibson's is to confound".


* * *



William Hogarth, 1697-1764.

Part of the Spiritual Growth Resource, John Wesley: Holiness of Heart and Life. Deals with Hogarth's attitudes towards Methodism from a modern Wesleyan point of view. Includes some brief remarks on Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism.


* * *



Artists' Papers Register: William Hogarth (1697-1764).

List of museums and libraries holding important manuscript papers written by, or concerning, Hogarth. Part of a location register of the papers of artists, designers and craftsmen held in publicly accessible collections in the United Kingdom.


* * *



The British Library: Explore Archives and Manuscripts.

Enter the name, "Hogarth (William)" and click on the "Search" button. Then you will see a list of British Library manuscripts written by, or relating to, Hogarth.


* * *



About the Hogarth Collections at the Lewis Walpole Library.

On the Hogarth collections at the Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT, that were formed by W.S. Lewis and Annie Burr Auchincloss Lewis following on their primary interest in Horace Walpole (1717-1797), who himself had been an enthusiastic collector of Hogarth.


* * *



Hogarth's Marriage Licence Allegation from the Vicar-General's Office.

Presents the original marriage licence allegation dated 20 March 1728 for William Hogarth and Jane Thornhill plus some additional commentary.


* * *



Hogarth's closing words of a letter to his wife, 6 June, 1749.

Quoted in A.M. Broadley, Chats on Autographs (1910).


* * *



University of Delaware Library: Special Collections Department: William Hogarth Engravings, 1732-1808.

List of thirteen engravings by, or after, Hogarth, plus a very short biographical note. Each of the prints in this collection "is crudely hand-colored using a bright palette. Because of the poor quality of the coloring, it is possible that the coloring was not comtemporary with the prints, but was done later."


* * *



A2A database: William Hogarth.

Search result from the Access to Archives database which contains catalogues describing archives held throughout England and dating from the 900s to the present day. Type in "William Hogarth" and click on the red "search" button.


* * *



Professor Dr Hans Weder, "Die sogenannte 'Line of Beauty and Grace'": Eine Überlegung zum Leben und zur Wissenschaft [Dies Academicus 2000].

Lengthy academic speech by the rector of the University of Zurich on the importance of the "Line of Beauty and Grace" and the Kairos to nature, scientific research and human culture.


* * *



Peter Forbes, "Beauty lies in an eye of scientific curves", The Age, 15 August 2002.

Article first published in the Guardian, 11 July, 2002, as "The beauty of curves". Briefly discusses whether there is a science of beauty. Also deals with the importance of curves in visual art. Includes some remarks on Hogarth's "Line of Beauty".


* * *



18. u. 19. Jahrhundert.

Web page for the Vienna Academy, written in German. Deals with eighteenth and nineteenth-century graffiti. Includes remarks on Hogarth's The Invasion and on a caricature by Steve Bell based on Hogarth's O the Roast Beef of Old England.


* * *



Museum of London: Creative Quarters: William Hogarth.

Short information on Hogarth's London dwellings.


* * *



Hogarth's House in Chiswick, Hogarth Lane, Great West Road, London, W4 2QN.

Brief information on Hogarth's House, a beautiful relic of his era, though damaged by bombing during the war, it has been carefully restored by the local council. See also this page on Hogarth's House..


* * *



The Museum of St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

Traces the history of St. Bartholomew's Hospital from 1123 until the present day. Includes some remarks on Hogarth's two stunning murals on the walls of the staircase of the hospital, one depicting the Good Samaritan and the other Christ healing the lame man at the pool of Bethesda.


* * *



Hogarth Court EC3.

Formerly part a Geocities Web site on the history of the streets of London. Hogarth Court was a relative newcomer to the London street scene. It used to be called Fishmonger Alley until 1936 when the authorities seized on a little piece of history connecting William Hogarth with the adjacent Elephant Tavern. Includes some additional remarks on Hogarth's London life.


* * *



Hogarth, William: painter, graphical artist: England.

Some short biographical notes plus an image of William Hogarth's tomb at St. Nicholas' Churchyard, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London.


* * *



Hogarth's Grave in Chiswick, The Independent, 24 March 1995.

Article by Andrew John Davies on Hogarth and his tomb.


* * *



Museum of London: BEDLAM.

Some remarks on Hogarth's image of Bedlam. Part of the online exhibition "Bedlam: Custody Care and Cure 1247-1997".


* * *



Roast Beef of Old England.

On the song The Roast Beef of Old England. Words and music by Richard Leveridge, 1735.


* * *



History Of The Pug.

On the long, dignified history of the pug. Hogarth's depiction of pugs is mentioned in passing.


* * *



Jessica Richard, Arts of Play: The Culture of Gambling in Eighteenth-Century Britain.

Dissertation abstract. Includes some remarks on Hogarth's A Rake's Progress, plate 6, his Assembly at Wanstead House, and The Lady's Last Stake.


* * *



Martin Wainwright, "Britons take to the bottle". Guardian Unlimited, 1 April 1999.

Summary of Professor John Chartres's remarks on the history of spirit drinking. "The artist William Hogarth was enlisted to etch the equivalent of Department of Health posters comparing the nightmare world of Gin Lane to cheery Beer Street, where only the pawnbrokers shop is falling down."


* * *



William Hogarth at Vauxhall Gardens: sex, art, music.

On Jonathan Tyers's Vauxhall Gardens. With Hogarth's help, these pleasure gardens became egalitarian spaces where the middle classes could mix with the intelligentsia and the minor nobility and amuse themselves in supper boxes, decorated with contemporary paintings and sculptures.


* * *



Mother Needham.

Newspaper reports on Mother Needham, the notorious bawd who, in the first scene of Hogarth's Harlot's Progress, recruits a country girl for her brothel.


* * *



The Georgian Underworld: Prostitution.

Chapter 15 of The Georgian Underworld by Rictor Norton deals with prostitution in eighteenth-century London. It includes a section on Mother Needham.


* * *



The Rabbit Woman.

Contemporary newspaper articles on Mary Toft, the "pretended rabbit breeder" whom Hogarth satirized in his print Cunicularii.


* * *



Dennis Todd, "New Evidence for Dr. Arbuthnot's Authorship of 'The Rabbit-Man-Midwife'", Studies in Bibliography, 41 (1988), 247-67.

On the authorship of The Rabbit-Man-Midwife, a short poem poking fun at some of the men involved in the affair of Mary Toft.


* * *



Dirk Puehl, "Über John Bullishness – Oh, the Roastbeef of Old England".

German paper on eating and drinking in eighteenth-century London. Includes subchapters on Gin Lane and Beer Street.


* * *



Quelques caricaturistes étrangers: Hogarth - Cruikshank - Goya - Pinelli - Brueghel.

French page on foreign caricaturists. Starts with a brief analysis of Hogarth's art.


* * *



Eighteenth Century England: A Site Created by and for Literature Students at the University of Michigan.

In-depth information on several aspects of the eighteenth century. Includes illustrations by Hogarth and other eighteenth-century artists. See Title Index of Student Projects and particularly the sites, Exploring Eighteenth Century England with William Hogarth and Comic Art in Eighteenth-Century England.


* * *



The Trial of 2 centuries: Public Execution - A Tale of Two Centuries.

Includes a short note on, and reproductions of, Hogarth's Four Stages of Cruelty.


* * *



Carl Heinrich Rahl (1779-1843): Der Weg eines Liederlichen (um 1818).

German notes on Carl Heinrich Rahl's 62 etchings after Hogarth's prints, particularly the first scene of A Rake's Progress, kept at the Ostfriesisches Landesmuseum, Emder Rüstkammer.


* * *



Jonathan Jones, "Take the ego out of art: Simon Rattle is right - Britain has a lot to learn from the high seriousness of Germany's cultural life", Guardian Unlimited, 26 August, 2002.

Compares Simon Rattle, the British conductor, with Hogarth's Enraged Musician.


* * *



Jonathan Jones, "Tate Modern gets a million visitors in just six weeks. Meanwhile, at poor old Tate Britain...", Guardian Unlimited, 28 June 2000.

Article on the unfashionable national collection of British art shown at the Tate Britain. Includes brief remarks on some of Hogarth's paintings.


* * *



Rhian Harris, "The Foundling Hospital", BBC History.

Notes on the Foundling Hospital. Includes a section on "Artists and the Foundling Hospital".


* * *



The Foundling Museum: William Hogarth.

Brief information on Hogarth and his works in the Foundling Museum.


* * *



Coram: Our Heritage.

Web site on one of England's oldest children's charities which was supported by Hogarth and became a centre of eighteenth-century philanthropy.


* * *



Maev Kennedy, "Grant saves Hogarth's take on The Tempest", Guardian Unlimited, 14 November, 2002.

Reports that A Scene from 'The Tempest' by Hogarth, under threat of being sold from the walls of the Yorkshire house, has been saved by a grant from the Art Fund charity.


* * *



Maev Kennedy, "Art victory secures charity collections", Guardian Unlimited, 14 June, 2002.

Reports that Hogarth's painting of The March to Finchley was acquired for the new Foundling Museum, London, for £4m.


* * *



Alison Benjamin, "A brush with history: Tate unveils painting celebrating Coram children's charity", Guardian Unlimited, 16 October, 2002.

On the Tate's unveiling of the large, montage-style painting, donated to the Coram Family by artist Rosa Branson, which shows the establishment of the London Foundling Hospital in 1739.


* * *



Roy Porter, "The Body Politic Diseases and Discourses", History Today, 51, no. 10 (October 2001), 23 ff.

One of the last papers written by the late Professor Roy Porter. Shows how eighteenth-century satirical images of the medical profession spilled over into the work of political caricaturists. Explains, for instance, that the medical profession was seen as quackery - a point William Hogarth epitomised in The Company of Undertakers - and medicine as a theatre of cruelty, which is is supremely expressed in The Reward of Cruelty.


* * *



Max Stafford-Clark, "The man who saved the stage", Guardian Unlimited, 5 October, 2002.

Tells how the first modern actor David Garrick put theatre at the heart of culture. Contains some passages on Hogarth.


* * *



Wikipedia: James Thornhill.

Short account of the life and art of Sir James Thornhill, Hogarth's father-in-law.


* * *



Dorset Magazine: In the Footsteps of ..... James Thornhill.

More detailed account of the life and work of the Dorset-born artist, Sir James Thornhill.


* * *



David Brown, "Statues effaced by acid clean", Guardian Unlimited, 23 October, 2002.

On the bad condition of the busts of Isaac Newton, William Hogarth, Joshua Reynolds, and the surgeon John Hunter, which have maintained a distinguished watch over Leicester Square in central London for almost 130 years and have now succumbed to a cleaner's brush.


* * *



William Hogarth and his Pug Dog: Hogarth statue to be provided with canine companion.

Reports that Hogarth will be commemorated in a fine statue by Jim Mathieson. It will be un-veiled in Chiswick High Road, "a short walk from the artist's summer home, which is now a museum in his memory". For the story of the campaign, see, in addition, Of Hogarth, Hockney and the Culture Minister....


* * *



Gin Lane - a Hogarth Inspired Doll's House.

Documents the progress of a doll's house inspired by the interiors of some of Hogarth's works.








A FINAL SUGGESTION



For those thousands of further references to the numerous valuable essays on Hogarth, which have appeared in many different languages in journals from all over the world during the past three centuries; and for other indispensible sources and publications, the reader should consult the forthcoming, annotated, two-volume Hogarth Bibliography by the author of this Web site.


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